Bright Field – Music and Art at The Guggenheim with Luke DuBois, Ashley Bathgate and Vicky Chow. 6:30, Tuesday May 24th

Have you ever forsaken a deeply loved thing, only to return years later with a new found joy and celebration as you approach it? Twenty-two years ago, I gave my life to the commissioning and performing of what we call ‘new music’, eventually becoming a composer myself. Since then, with the exception of a little Stravinsky and Bartok, I haven’t played publicly a composition of those venerable ones who’ve gone on before us, not out of a disdain or dislike of that music, but out of a belief that the lifeblood of classical music exists not in the tradition, but rather in the creation of music in our time.

I’m thrilled to report that the music of Debussy and Kodaly have once again intersected my musical practice in a concert of duos with two of my favorite musicians, Bang on a Can All-Stars Ashley Bathgate and Vicky Chow. All three of us have been performing as Typical Music, a modular ensemble which expands and contracts with the base of a piano trio, often joined by fellow All-Star, composer and clarinetist, Evan Ziporyn.

Here’s the story: My video partner and artist Luke DuBois does these great lectures at the Guggenheim exploring the relationship between musical and visual art. The last one was Kandinsky. This one focuses on art during the period of 1910-1917 on May 24th at 6:30. The musical program and lecture accompanies The Great Upheaval exhibition in the rotunda.

Click here for more information and to reserve tickets

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3 responses to “Bright Field – Music and Art at The Guggenheim with Luke DuBois, Ashley Bathgate and Vicky Chow. 6:30, Tuesday May 24th

  1. “Have you ever forsaken a deeply loved thing, only to return years later with a new found joy and celebration as you approach it?”

    Definitely. For me, it seems I am in a state of perpetual forsaking and returning. The joy we find is the perfect and natural consequence of our growth as people, as creators, as. It is, too, the result of our forgetfulness, I believe, of how much our ‘self-as-past’ is in our ‘self-as-present;’ typically, ‘places’ our ‘self-as-present’ wish to turn are those ‘places’ where joy exists. Our ‘self-as-past’ is our only true reference for those ‘places.’ It is for this reason we should strive to daily add new things in which we come to find joy. Sitting quietly is never a bad way to start.

    Lecture. Indiana is not New York. Too bad. Ancestry is helpful.

    Shalom [+]

  2. Hello,

    Do you have a recording of the musical portion of this event? I wanted to use bits of it (especially the Webern Shorts) for an audio essay. Send me an email if this is possible.

    thanks.

    • Hi Hethre… I’m looking into this. I’m not sure exactly what we have, but I have a feeling that it might end up as some content on youtube. Please stay tuned, and feel free to inquire again if I don’t get back to you soon, okay?

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